Category Archives: Educational Information

Over 40? Let’s Talk About Presbyopia

Around age 40 to 45, patients will find their near vision (reading a book or using a smart phone) gradually becoming more blurry. Patients may find they must hold their book further away to clearly read the text.  Reading for long periods of time may become uncomfortable and create eyestrain. This condition is known as presbyopia. Presbyopia is a… Read More »


Have you been checking your grid?

For patients diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), we hand out an Amsler grid. Pictured below, this grid has a central dot to focus on with a grid pattern. We ask each patient who has ARMD to check this grid daily. With consistent monitoring at home (which only takes a few seconds for each eye), patients… Read More »


“Bloodshot” Eye

Not uncommonly, patients call in noting a “bloody” eye that seemed to come out of nowhere. Either they look in the mirror and are surprised, or a friend/family member notices the new redness.  While vision is not changed and the eye remains painless, the sight of blood consistently alarms patients. What is going on? For the… Read More »


Five tips to limit damage from Macular Degeneration

Most commonly affecting patients over the age of 55, age-related macular degeneration is a chronic disease that affects central vision over time.  While patients with early stages of the disease may not notice any change, those with advanced macular degeneration have profound visual deficiencies.  If you have macular degeneration, consider these tips to help limit… Read More »


Tricky lashes. . .trichiasis

When eyelashes function normally, they help to protect our eyes from the environment. Eyelashes help to deflect debris from entering our eyes. Lashes also help us sense if something is very close to our eyes-causing us to blink. Blinking refreshes our eyes with tears. Most days, we don’t even think about our eyelashes. For some patients, instead… Read More »


Slowing Cataract Changes

Did you know that after our late 50s to 60s, the natural lenses in our eyes begin to become cloudy and yellow? These changes are known as cataracts.  Over time, patients with cataracts notice glare and halos around bright lights, fuzzy vision while watching TV, as well as needed more and more light to read. Cataracts can make enjoyable daily… Read More »


Those pesky floaters. . .

Have you noticed floaters in your vision before? Floaters occur for several reasons. Some people are born with floaters. Throughout fetal development, an artery in the eye dissolves over time. If any remnants of the artery persist after birth, these fragments float in gel in the back of the eyes. These floaters are not concerning,… Read More »


Bifocals can be your PAL

Bifocals help patients over 40 years old read with clarity and comfort. Around this age, our eyes gradually lose the ability to focus on near vision tasks such as reading or using a computer. Traditionally, bifocals and trifocals had distinct lines across the lenses. These work well for many people, but what if a bifocal… Read More »


What are scleral contact lenses?

Scleral contact lenses are larger than standard gas permeable (GP) contact lenses. The smallest sclerals are approximately 14.5 mm in diameter, and the largest can be up to 24 mm. Lenses that are 18 mm or smaller are subcategorized as mini-sclerals. The average human cornea is approximately 11.8 mm in diameter so even the smallest… Read More »


Advanced Eye Care Center Offering RetnaGene- Genetic Testing for Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of visual impairment and the leading cause of blindness in the elderly population in the developed world. It is estimated that there are currently 9.1 million patients in the USA with AMD, 1.7 million suffering with the vision-threatening late stage complications of choroidal neovascularization (Wet AMD)… Read More »


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